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Jun
18
Tue
New Music Open Mic Night
Jun 18 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Charlotte New Music Festival invites musicians and composers to perform their music in a fun, casual setting at Crown Station! Whether it’s performing a previously written work, exploring something new and unusual, or an improvisation, sign up now and share your creativity! Sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/fMgHZhOVzkSLFKDj2

For this year’s New Music Open Mic Night, we’re partnering with John Shaugnessy and his jazz improv night. The house band will perform a short set and then composers and performers from all over the world will be presenting new and experimental compositions in classical, improvised music, electronic music, and jazz. Admission is FREE.

Jun
19
Wed
Bruce Hornsby and The Noisemakers
Jun 19 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

From early mainstream successes to imaginative collaborations with icons like the Grateful Dead, Spike Lee, Bonnie Raitt and Bob Dylan, Bruce Hornsby continues to demonstrate exceptional focus on idiosyncratic, creative projects. Backed by The Noisemakers, his return to the Charlotte stage offers a glimpse of the restless spirit that continues to push him into exciting new musical terrain.

Jun
20
Thu
Thursdays Live music series
Jun 20 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

You’re invited to Thursdays Live – free live music, cold beer, food from Hawthorne’s NY Pizza and refreshments from 6 until 8pm. It’s happening all summer, the 3rd Thursday of each month. Come hang out with your MoRA neighbors! At the new Embrace sculpture, located at the intersection of Monroe Rd and Conference Dr.  Here’s a short video from last year:  https://youtu.be/n_kkmLDi2zc

UPSTATE
Jun 20 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

For Upstate, the last few years have been a time of profound exploration and self-discovery. As the band knocked off milestone after milestone on the road, their sound, their lineup, and even their name all underwent dramatic metamorphoses. Challenging and thrilling all at once, those changes have finally culminated in the sextet’s dazzling new album, a collection that showcases both their remarkable growth and their adventurous blend of folk, R&B, jazz, gospel, and rock and roll.

Recorded primarily over six days at the Clubhouse studio in Rhinebeck, NY, ‘Healing’ is the band’s first release with new member Allison Olender, their first with four contributing songwriters, and their first since shortening their name from Upstate Rubdown. It’s also their first project to be produced by Wood Brothers percussionist Jano Rix, who helped the group embrace their transformation and lean in to their unique lineup without sacrificing any of the gorgeous harmonies, eclectic arrangements, and unforgettable performances that have defined the band since their earliest days.

Upstate first emerged from New York’s Hudson Valley in 2015 with their critically acclaimed debut, ‘A Remedy.’ The Poughkeepsie Journal raved that the group “need[s] nothing more than their voices to channel rhythm and stoke your emotions,” while Chronogram hailed their “infectiously sunny organic stew,” and The Alt called them “toe-tapping, contagious, and fun.” The album earned the band festival performances from Mountain Jam to Fresh Grass, as well as a slew of national headline dates and support slots with everyone from The Felice Brothers and Phox to Marco Benevento and Cory Henry.

EVENT DETAILS:

  • When: Thursday, June 20
  • Time: 7:00pm – 10:00pm
  • Location: River Jam Stage
  • Cost: Free and open to the public
  • Weather: Events are scheduled to proceed rain or shine.  In the event of severe weather, the USNWC reserves the right to reschedule/cancel live music performances.
HousingFest 2019 featuring Mandolin Orange
Jun 20 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Mandolin Orange’s music radiates a mysterious warmth —their songs feel like whispered secrets, one hand cupped to your ear. The North Carolina duo have built a steady and growing fanbase with this kind of intimacy, and on Tides of A Teardrop, due out February 1, it is more potent than ever. By all accounts, it is the duo’s fullest, richest, and most personal effort. You can hear the air between them—the taut space of shared understanding, as palpable as a magnetic field, that makes their music sound like two halves of an endlessly completing thought. Singer-songwriter Andrew Marlin and multiinstrumentalist Emily Frantz have honed this lamp glow intimacy for years.

For this album, Marlin and Frantz enlisted their touring band, who they also worked with on their last album Blindfaller. Having recorded all previous albums live in the studio, they approached the recording process in a different way this time. “We went and did what most people do, which we’ve never done before—we just holed up somewhere and worked the tunes out together,” Frantz says. There is a telepathy and warmth in the interplay on Tides of A Teardrop that brings a new dynamic to the foreground—that holy silence between notes, the air that charges the album with such profound intimacy. “This record is a little more cosmic, almost in a spiritual way—the space between the notes was there to suggest all those empty spaces the record touches on,” acknowledges Marlin. There are many powerful ways of acknowledging loss; sometimes the most powerful one is saying nothing at all.

Jun
21
Fri
Nathan Angelo (Full Band) Kevin Goodwin
Jun 21 @ 7:30 pm
Nathan Angelo

Nathan Angelo

In the ever-changing landscape of modern pop, Nathan Angelo shines as a refreshing alternative, embracing the classic elements of popular music and celebrating the backbeat of American tradition. As the revival of music in the 60’s and 70’s brought together the heritage of the Great American songbook, the flair of jazz and heartache of the Delta blues, Angelo integrates these forms into his own music with great ease and delight. For the past decade, Angelo has captivated audiences across the country with his high-spirited live show and captured the imagination of a loyal following through prolific songwriting, independently selling over 40,000 albums along the way.
Angelo’s latest full-length album A Matter of Time (Aug 2017) reflects his journey through the life-altering experiences of becoming a father and facing his daughter’s rare, life-threatening metabolic disease. His daughter received a liver transplant in Fall 2016, and Angelo’s latest release A Matter of Time wrestles with the aches of adversity and ultimately celebrates the beauty of life and the hope he has for his daughter. A Matter of Time embraces the soul, classic r&b and piano-pop of some of Angelo’s more prominent influences — Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye and Elton John — while fearlessly venturing into new sonic territory to compete with pop contemporaries like Bruno Mars and Justin Timberlake. Alongside his finest songwriting to date, Angelo’s voice resounds as an irrefutable force as he carries listeners to new places unfamiliar to the likes of modern pop music.

A Matter of Time debuted at #12 on the iTunes singer-songwriter charts and has already garnered more than 1,000,000 streams on Spotify.

Kevin Goodwin

Kevin Goodwin

Kevin Goodwin is a singer/songwriter from Charlotte, North Carolina.
An active songwriter since childhood, Kevin Goodwin made his debut onto the music scene with his 2018 single, ‘All I Can Think About’. The upbeat, pop-rock song followed the theme of missed opportunities and was accompanied by a story driven music video. 

Soon after his first single began to receive airplay on local radio stations, Goodwin released a second single, called ‘Alaska’. A stark contrast to his first release, ‘Alaska’ told the story of a young woman struggling with suicidal thoughts. The emotional track would go on to be added to Spotify’s ‘Radar Indie’ playlist, where it garnered thousands of streams.

After the success of ‘Alaska’, Goodwin released his debut EP, “This Is How It Starts”, on February 1st, 2019. The record included both of his previous singles, as well as three new songs that have quickly become crowd favorites at live shows. 

With piano driven verses, lush guitars, and an earnest voice, he aims to relate to listeners in a direct and intimate way. Drawing influence from artists such as The Fray and Jack’s Mannequin, Goodwin’s music strives to stand out from today’s pop music with deep lyrical storytelling and emotionally expressive music.

Jun
22
Sat
Dane Page Heart Hunters
Jun 22 @ 7:30 pm
Dane Page

Dane Page

Dane Page is a singer-songwriter living in Charlotte, North Carolina. Influenced by the traditions of Hank Williams and Woody Guthrie, his music reflects the complexities of modern life while keeping true to the simple tenets of songwriting. Dane’s lyrics weave listeners through Greek mythology, 20th Century literature, and American history while telling stories of love, loss, happiness, and pain. His music pulls from contemporary folk artists like Josh Ritter and Gregory Alan Isakov, but also ventures into sounds reminiscent of The War on Drugs and Tame Impala.

Dane Page continues to tour through the southeast and mid-Atlantic in support of his independently produced EP City to City. A collection of bawdy, rambler tunes perfect for taprooms, bars, and breweries. Selma (Summer 2018) will be his first full-length record. Selma is a more mature album that pushes the boundaries of folk and gives Dane the space to fully develop his sound.

Dane is a storyteller perfect for intimate rooms where audiences can delve into the imagery and lyricism of his songs. The full band—Eric Fellner on bass, Kevin Orlando on guitar, and Josh Kelley on drums—is a dynamic act taking Dane’s solo storytelling ability and adding an infectious blend of folk, rock, and blues capable of filling music halls and festival stages. In either setting, listeners are welcomed into the music and leave feeling like old friends after a bonfire.

Heart Hunters

Heart Hunters

Heart Hunters’ Drew de Man founded his first band, No River City, in 2001 and spent the next several years making records, touring the country and sharing bills with artists such as Iron & Wine, Calexico, and Alejandro Escovedo. After a decade away from the spotlight, his new project Heart Hunters—a duo with his wife, singer/songwriter Brianna Blackbird—builds on the moody indie/alt-country sound de Man explored with No River City, updating them for a new era with debut LP American Eclipse. 

Produced by Peter Case (T-Bone Burnett, John Hiatt, Mike Campbell), American Eclipse puts Heart Hunters’ gorgeously wounded harmonies front-and-center

KIM RICHEY + JOSH ROUSE
Jun 22 @ 8:00 pm
KIM RICHEY

KIM RICHEY

Edgeland moves roots singer/subtle excavator of the human condition Kim Richey through the topography of the life lived by a woman committed to following her music. Flinching over hurting another, knowing the ways of the road, seeking higher ground and accepting the fact everyone’s truth isn’t a white picket fence, she continues defying labels as she defines the thinking person’s life.

“Right now, my stuff is all in storage,” she says of her state of constant motion. “I’ve lived in a lot of different places – different countries even. It’s a little overwhelming, keeping track of stuff, but it’s been an amazing trip because music has taken me places I never dreamed.

“I’m the same way with writing. Even when I’ve finished a record, or am in the middle of recording, I’m writing. Writing songs is what I do; it’s how I connect with the world.”

That sense of motion infuses Edgeland with immediacy. From the Buck Owens/Don Rich opening notes of “Red Line,” the dusky blond sweeps listeners up in her whirl. If “Red Line” is a missed train and a moment of immersion in the station, “The Get Together” shimmers with a Laurel Canyon lushness and ease in the awkward (that evokes J.D. Souther’s post-romantic midtempos) and “Can’t Seem To Let You Go” owns the ‘60s Merseybeat pop luxury of the Seekers or Dusty Springfield in Memphis. Demonstrating a facility for slipping in and out of oeuvres and emotions, this – in many ways — culminates her passage through music.

Kim Richey is a traveller, after all. Musically, physically, emotionally. Not merely restless or rootless, it’s who she is. Willing to follow where the music leads, she’s landed in Los Angeles, Nashville, London, working with a who’s who of producers – Richard Bennett, Hugh Padgham, Bill Bottrell, Angelo, Giles Martin. She’s attracted a coterie of top-shelf genre-definers — Jason Isbell, Trisha Yearwood, Chuck Prophet, My Morning Jacket’s Carl Broemel, Wilco’s Pat Sansone – for her critically-lauded projects. She has also sung on records for Ryan Adams, Shawn Colvin, Isbell, and Rodney Crowell.

Part of what draws them to the dusky honey of her crystalline alto is the way she writes: to and from the soul, never flinching from the conflicts and crushing moments, yet always finding dignity and resilience. Her arc of the human heart is true. True enough that over the years, Richey’s been both Grammy nominated. Nominated for Yearwood’s truculently groove-country “Baby, I Lied,” she also co-wrote Radney Foster’s #1 “Nobody Wins.”

“Harlan Howard said – and maybe I’ve taken it too much to heart, ‘It’s always more believable if you sing it in the first person.’ And when I sit down to write, if it’s something I’m going to sing, I want it to be what I want it to be. I don’t really settle, which may make me a little hard to write with. But I have to be able to stand up and sing it night after night, and I can’t if I don’t really believe it.”

Those standards made Glimmer one of TIME’s Top Records of 1999 and Rise named People’s Best Alt-Country Record of 2002. Even when singing from the point of view of a guy working on a barge going up and down the Ohio River in “Dear John,” her aim is true. As she says of the man refusing to read the letter that ends his romance, “because if I don’t read your letter, then it’s not over. Sometimes these songs are specific and personal, but it’s also true in ways that reflect so many other people’s experience, too.”

Sometimes Richey channels profound truths. Sometimes she embraces breezy freedom. “Leavin’ Song,” a rambler’s shuffle, is more about tasting the world than exiting a bad situation. As its chorus offers, “This ain’t no leaving song, you ain’t done nothing wrong” over an electric banjo and Resonator guitar, Richey finds the sweet spot in exulting for just being alive.

Once again, Richey has drawn a multitude of collaborators who rival her own singular voice. Veteran journeymen artist/writers Chuck Prophet, Maendo Sanz, Mike Henderson (Steeldrivers), Bill Deasy (the Gathering Field), Pat McLaughlin (John Prine) and Al Anderson (NRBQ), plus Aussies Jenny Queen and Harry Hokey co-sign on these musical polaroids from the going, the leaving, and the pausing.

“I’ll be doing an interview, and people will say, ‘You co-write a lot…’,” she marvels, “like it’s a bad thing. But it’s inspiring to me, and takes me in other directions, to other places. The people I write with are funny, and smart, and a blast to hang out with, but they’re also really good writers in their own right. Nobody’s pandering or chasing ‘a hit,’ we’re all just trying to get to the best possible song.”

Whether growing up, owning and relinquishing high times in the sleek “Chase Wild Horses,” echoed in the ether-lite, percussive folk “High Time,” then jettisoned on the smoky acceptance of her own flawed inability to be in a romance on the Western-tinged on “I Tried,” the woman from Ohio makes our natural selves both exotic and homey.

Richey enlisted producer Brad Jones, known for Over the Rhine, Josh Rouse, Butterfly Boucher, Hayes Carll and Marshall Crenshaw, in crafting an adult album that evokes and provokes musically. “I wasn’t sure at first if we’d be a good combo because he has such strong opinions, and I do, too. But it was (laughter) the easiest record I’ve ever made. He has really different ideas, and it’s nice to have somebody push you in a direction you might not have gone – and have them respect your opinion, too. I really loved working with Brad.””

With three different tracking bands, Edgeland is a who’s who of Nashville’s roots players: beyond co-writers, steel player Dan Dugmore, drummer Jerry Roe, multi-instrumentalist Sansone, guitarist/various stringed thing players Doug Lancio and Dan Cohen, string arranger Chris Carmichael and Robin Hitchcock all contribute to the bewitchery.

“So many of these guys produce and make records on their own,” she marvels. “I’m open to collaboration, too. These songs wouldn’t sound the way they do without these players.”

The noir-slink of “Pin A Rose,” a cautionary told-you-so tale of domestic abuse’s repeat cycles, the neo-madrigal “Not for Money or Love,” inspired by the father Richey lost at 2, and the Mellotron-tinged austerity of “Black Trees,” finished after a few years gestation during a residency at the Banff Centre for the Arts Colony and expanded to consider a refugee’s fortunes, all seek and explore. Here melody reinforces words, feelings, even interpersonal dynamics. Simplicity – as executed – breaks complicated things into evocative clouds that seep into the listeners unconscious.

“It’s a lot easier to say something in a song than in a conversation,” allows the easy-going grown-up. “And it’s not all about me, but the people in the songs. Even the stuff you leave out says something, so you’re creating on so many layers. And sometimes I don’t know where it comes from, just some other place.”

Listening to “Whistle On Occasion,” the Everly-esque closer duet with Prophet, Richey owns one’s place in the world. Here, there, going or gone, that’s all anyone can ask.

Holly Gleason

JOSH ROUSE

JOSH ROUSE

Never one to ignore the call of his muse, Rouse traded in his trusty acoustic guitar for a synthesizer, a move that quickly pulled him in a slew of exciting, unexpected directions as he found himself freshly inspired by the endless array of possibilities at his fingertips. Where ‘Embers’ was a deeply personal, countrypolitan contemplation on identity and anxiety, the new material that poured out of him was breezier and more carefree, crafted with an 80’s-inspired sonic palette that complemented the shift from somber introspection to more playful observation. The end result, ‘Love In The Modern Age,’ is an album that still bears Rouse’s distinct fingerprints, even as it pushes his limits and forges a bold new chapter more than twenty years into his celebrated career. 

Hailed as “a talent to outrank Ryan Adams or Conor Oberst” by Uncut and praised for his “spare and easy sounding guitar songs” by NPR, Rouse first emerged in 1998 with his debut album, ‘Dressed Up Like Nebraska,’ which Billboard called a “dark horse gem.” Over the next two decades, he’d go on to release a steady stream of critically lauded records that would solidify his status as one of the his generation’s most acclaimed songwriters, both in the US and Europe, where he’s lived on and off since 2004. Q called his breakout album, ‘1972,’ “the most intimate record of the year,” while Rolling Stone dubbed his follow-up, ‘Nashville,’ “a landmark album,” and EW described 2013’s ‘The Happiness Waltz’ as “a big contender for Rouse’s best work.” In 2014, Rouse won a Goya Award (the Spanish equivalent of an Oscar) for best song for “Do You Really Want To Be In Love,” from the film ‘La Gran Familia Española.

As he began work on ‘Love In The Modern Age,’ Rouse was caught in a moment of international limbo. He was ready to relocate from Spain back to Nashville with his family, but his wife’s green card process was stretching out interminably. As they awaited news from the US government, their Tennessee home sat empty for more than a year, and Rouse found himself making regular trips across the Atlantic to check in on the property.

“I started working on songs with my old friend and writing partner Daniel Tashian on those trips,” Rouse explains. “I’d just finished reading Sylvie Simmons’ great Leonard Cohen biography, ‘I’m Your Man,’ and it got me really into Cohen’s synthier records. I told Daniel that I thought it’d be fun to write some stuff in that vein, so we’d start with these moody soundscapes, and then I’d write lyrics on top of them.”

Inspired by Cohen and cult heroes The Blue Nile, as well as the English bands Rouse grew up listening to like The Cure and The Smiths, the songs were cinematic and enveloping. Each track created its own entrancing world out of dense synthesizer textures and shimmering electric guitar lines. While many of his previous albums were recorded with a full band performing live in one room, Rouse built up the tracks on ‘Love In The Modern Age’ a layer at a time, recording the majority of the instruments himself between Spain and Nashville.
in me that wouldn’t have happened with just an acoustic guitar.”

Much like love in our modern age, the album is defined by the coming together of those physical and digital worlds. Underneath it all, though, lays the same endless search for human connection that drives each and every one of us. Times may change, but the song remains the same.

Jun
23
Sun
HAYES CARLL with BEN DICKEY
Jun 23 @ 8:00 pm

HAYES CARLL

The chorus to the title track on the new Hayes Carll album, What It Is, is a manifesto.  What it was is gone forever / What it could be God only knows. What it is is right here in front of me / and I’m not letting go. He’s embracing the moment. Leaving the past where it belongs, accepting there’s no way to know what’s ahead, and challenging himself to be present in both love and life. It’s heady stuff. It also rocks. With a career full of critical acclaim and popular success, Carll could’ve played it safe on this, his sixth record, but he didn’t. The result is a musically ambitious and lyrically deep statement of an artist in his creative prime. Hayes Carll’s list of accomplishments is long. His third album, 2008’s Trouble In Mind, earned him an Americana Music Association Award for  Song of the Year (for “She Left Me for Jesus”). The follow-up, KMAG YOYO was the most played album on the Americana Chart in 2011 and spawned covers by artists as varied as Hard Working Americans and Lee Ann Womack, whose version of ‘Chances Are’ garnered Carll a Grammy nomination for Best Country Song. 2016’s Lovers and Leavers swept the Austin Music Awards, and was his fourth record in a row to reach #1 on the Americana Airplay chart.  Kelly Willis and Kenny Chesney have chosen to record his songs and his television appearances include The Tonight Show, Austin City Limits, and Later w/Jools Holland. Carll is the rare artist who can rock a packed dancehall one night and hold a listening room at rapt attention the next.  “Repeating myself creatively would ultimately leave me empty. Covering new ground, exploring, and taking chances gives me juice and keeps me interested.” He knew he wanted to find the next level. On What It Is, he clearly has.  It wasn’t necessarily easy to get there. Carll’s last release, 2016’s Lovers and Leavers was an artistic and commercial risk — a bold move which eschewed the tempo and humor of much of his previous work. The record revealed a more serious singer-songwriter dealing with more serious subjects — divorce, new love in the middle of life, parenting, the worth of work. What It Is finds him now on the other side, revived and happy, but resolute — no longer under the impression that any of it comes for free. “I want to dig in so this life doesn’t just pass me by. The more engaged I am the more meaning it all has. I want that to be reflected in the work.” And meaning there is. Carll sings “but I try because I want to,” on the album’s opening track, “None’Ya.” He’s not looking back lamenting love lost, rather, finding joy and purpose in the one he’s got and hanging on to the woman who sometimes leaves him delightedly scratching his head. “If I May Be So Bold,” finds him standing on similar ground  — lyrically taking on the challenge of participating fully in life rather than discontentedly letting life happen.  Bold enough to not surrender bold enough to give a damn Bold enough to keep on going or to stay right where I am There’s a whole world out there waiting full of stories to be told I’ll heed the call and tell’em all if I may be so bold There’s no wishy washy here and he’s not on the sidelines. In fact, he’s neck-deep in life. On the rambunctious, fiddle-punctuated, “Times Like These,” he laments political division in America while delivering a rapid-fire plea to “do my labor, love my girl, and help my neighbor, while keeping all my joie de vivre.” Carll’s signature cleverness and aptitude for so-personal-you-might-miss-it political commentary is as strong as ever. The stark, “Fragile Men,” co-written with singer-songwriter Lolo, uses humor and dripping sarcasm to examine his gender’s resistance to change in less than three minutes of string-laden, almost Jacques Brel invoking drama. It’s new musical territory for Carll, and the result is powerful. His voice is strong and resonant on these songs, and it’s thrilling to hear him use it with a new authority. He is alternately commanding and tender, yet always soulful. Carll returned to trusted producer Brad Jones (producer of 2008’s Trouble in Mind and 2011’s KMAG YOYO) and Alex the Great Studio in Nashville, Tennessee, to record What It Is, and recruited singer-songwriter, author, and fiancee Allison Moorer as co-producer. The production is adventurous while keeping the focus on the singer and his songs and providing a path for him to go where he wants to go. Where that is, is forward. That’s evident in the songwriting. Carll continues to hone his singular voice, but is also a flexible co-writer. Matraca Berg, Charlie Mars, Adam Landry, and Moorer have co-writing credits here, but it was Moorer’s inspiration that provided the largest impact. “On the songwriting front she’s just a pro. She helps me cut through the noise and she does it with wit and style.” Carll’s own wit and style has never been more evident. Whether it’s with the put-you-in-picture detail of, “Beautiful Thing,” the not quite sheepish enough, dude-esque defense of dishonesty in, “Things You Don’t Wanna Know,” or the strong as a tree trunk declaration of love on, “I Will Stay,” he displays an increasing command of his poetic lexicon. Writers most often wrestle with experience and expectations, either romanticizing the past or telling us how good it’s going to be when they get where they’re going. What It Is is a record that is rooted solidly in the present, revealing an artist in the emotional and intellectual here and now. 

www.hayescarll.com

 


BEN DICKEY

Start Time: 8:00

 

For a guy whose career has evolved more by serendipity than design, Ben Dickey’s professional journey has turned into one heckuva ride. It’s not every day an obscure musician’s famous actor/ director friend hands him the lead in a passion-project indie film, and he not only winds up sharing the screen with one of his musical heroes, he also wins a Sundance Film Festival Special Jury Prize for Dramatic Achievement in Acting — and a Variety magazine “for your consideration” plug for a Best Actor Oscar nomination.  Dickey’s acting debut in Blaze, Ethan Hawke’s biopic about doomed Texas singer-songwriter Blaze Foley, has already led to more roles, including their pairing as bounty hunters in The Kid, a western directed by Vincent D’Onofrio. But just as exciting, as far as Dickey’s concerned, is the opportunity it provided to record with that musical hero, longtime Bob Dylan guitarist Charlie Sexton (who played Blaze’s other troubled Texas songwriting legend, Townes Van Zandt). After they did the film’s original cast recording (on Light in the Attic Records), Sexton produced Dickey’s solo album, A Glimmer on the Outskirts. That inspired Sexton, Hawke and Blazeexecutive producer Louis Black to form SexHawkeBlack Records, a new Austin-based imprint under the umbrella of Nashville’s Dualtone Records. Dickey’s March 7, 2019 release is the label’s first. It’s hardly Dickey’s first recording foray, however. In fact, he says, he preferred the idea of forming a label to shopping for one because he’d been signed before — and still bears scars from watching the dream morph into a momentum-sucking nightmare. But SexHawkeBlack president Erika Pinktipps happens to be friends with Dualtone’s founder; that connection quickly turned into an actual alliance. “We’re all doing this together,” Dickey says, “[it’s] a group of people who all care about each other and have similar artistic arrows pointed in the same direction.” Dickey was 10 when his artistic arrow started pointing toward music; that’s when his grandfather handed down his 1935 Gibson L-30 archtop. “He was a magical fellow, and his guitar is, too,” Dickey says. “So I wanted to be magic, too.”  Within a year, his grandfather was gone. The magic, fortunately, stayed. But conjuring it wasn’t always easy for a kid growing up in Little Rock, Arkansas, far from his dad — a college football star who’d moved to Georgia after the parental split, when Dickey was 4. Ten years later, Dickey’s mother left, too — following her friend and boss, Bill Clinton, from the Arkansas Governor’s Mansion to the White House. Dickey moved into his grandmother’s basement — and became one more angry, disaffected teenage rocker.  He formed his first “real” band, Shake Ray Turbine, at 16, made his first record at 17 and began touring at 18, ditching Little Rock Central High (most famous students: the Little Rock Nine) for an $850 Ford van. When the founder of their D.I.Y. label, File 13 Records, headed to Philadelphia for college, they followed. Dickey wound up staying for 17 years, becoming a chef, falling in love and making music, first with Amen Booze Rooster (the band that got signed, then shafted), then with Blood Feathers. That band recorded three albums, including one created over “a magical rock ‘n’ roll summer” at a Nova Scotia home Hawke owns. (Hawke’s wife and Dickey’s “sweetheart,” artist Beth Blofson, have been besties since childhood.) Several labels and a top management agency courted them, but some members’ changing priorities and Dickey’s label trauma scotched potential deals. Still, when Blood Feathers fractured, he was heartbroken. It was time for another change. Once again, a music connection provided it. The band’s former manager had returned to north Louisiana to run his dad’s cotton farm, and offered Dickey and Blofson a vacant house on the rural property. They’ve been frolicking in that cotton since 2014.  Before leaving Philly, however, Dickey devoted 81⁄2 months of Mondays (most chefs’ lone day off) to recording Sexy Birds & Salt Water Classics, his first solo album. Former Arkansas Times arts editor Robert Bell called it “impeccable rock ‘n’ roll … which effortlessly melds Dylan/Petty singer-songwriter tunes and a touch of T. Rex-y sheen with a peppering of country-blues guitar- picking of the first order.” Classics took Dickey in a folkier direction, which continues with A Glimmer on the Outskirts. ?With a broad, low-edged tenor, this 6-foot, 5-inch linebacker’s son sometimes sounds remarkably like Dylan. But while he claims to be influenced by all musical forms, including “mockingbird word, Marshall feedback stack, tap-dance prance, orbital odes and Dinah the dog” (a partial list), Dickey says he’s most attracted to cats like jump bluesmen Big Joe Turner and T-Bone Walker and especially, the phrasing of Piedmont/ragtime bluesman Blind Willie McTell.  “I’ve been doin’ an impersonation of him forever,” Dickey claims. “He takes joy in certain words, and the listener likes that. And I like that.” Of his own style, he says, “I reckon I play rock ‘n’ roll — emphasis on the roll.” “The roll” is about musicality and rhythm, he explains. It’s the unforced ease of big-band swing, or the way late guitarist Hubert Sumlin played before or after the beat, creating another rhythmic pattern. “Chuck Berry doing the first 16 bars of ‘Maybelline’ is a microinjection of what I consider rock ‘n’ roll. When I think of rock ‘n’ roll, I think of that; I think of the Stones; I think of the Beatles’ ‘I Feel Fine.’” The roll is all over A Glimmer on the Outskirts, most of which was written over a few days afterBlaze wrapped, except for “Eloise” and his easygoing, JJ Cale-like cover of Foley’s “Sittin’ By the Road.” “When I say wrote, I mean they just came,” Dickey clarifies. “They usually come in clusters.” That helps explain their thematic connection; the album, he says, is an exploration of hope. “Hope comes in different ways, and in little doses, like when you’re on the freeway and you’re hungry, and you see a sign for food,” he says. “It also comes when you’re chest deep in quicksand and you see someone coming with a rope.” In “Stranger on a Silver Horse (Be Amazed),” it comes “on the outskirts of town, like A Fistful of Dollars; a fixer or something.” In “Sing that One to Me,” hope takes the form of an adventure. Its lyrics directly mention that fixer, who appears again as Dickey explains the album title “refers to finding or remembering hope when all is lost, but there’s a light on the edge of town, or the edge of the galaxy. A fixer on the way.”  That’s not necessarily a divine metaphor, however. Celestial citations fill Dickey’s lyrics and conversation, but they’re mainly astronomical, not biblical (though he does debate what’s heaven and what’s hell in “I Think It’s All Different”). His favorite memory involves watching the Orionids meteor shower with his family when he was 3, and he admits, “My version of counting sheep is reading how fast Jupiter is expanding and despanding through the day.” He’s got a thing for prime numbers and has fantasized about working for NASA, but can’t imagine not making music. “That’s how I relate to the world,” he says. “I’ve always been drawn to it.” Eventually, he figured out why.  “What happens when you go to a show? You form a relationship with an artist,” he notes. Despite the uncertainties and absurdities of the troubadour life, Dickey needs that connection — “this weird hour of time where you share with a group of people” — to satisfy his soul. Something else he’s figured out: the benefits of trust. After finally agreeing to let Hawke put him onscreen, Dickey discovered he loves acting. “It’s very musical,” he says, “so it feels natural.” He also agreed to let Sexton choose the album’s songs, and players: drummer Conrad Choucroun,bassist John Michael Shoepf, pedal steel player Mike Hardwick and keyboardist, pianist and Mellotron player Bukka Allen. (Dickey and Sexton both play guitar and sing; Blofson sings backing vocals and Emily Galusha whistles on “The Man with the Hammer.”) Dickey is thrilled with the results. He’s giddy about life in general right now. It took a while for him to find his script, so to speak, but he sums up the experiences between getting his grandfather’s guitar and his current pursuits with a perfect quote from Blaze: “You might not get what you go after, but you do get what you wouldn’t have got, if you hadn’t gone after what you didn’t get.” 

www.bendickeymusic.com

Jun
28
Fri
Matt Heckler Casper Allen
Jun 28 @ 7:30 pm
Matt Heckler

Matt Heckler

The Catskills, where he grew up and the Carolina Appalachians he calls home are old mountains, but the kids there are more likely to be raised on punk than old time string bands. Heckler took both with him when he left and sharpened a distinctive sound on banjo and fiddle the scientific way, as a street performer who could measure the days artistic growth in single dollar bills. Attracting the attention of musicians, as well as passers-by, he spent half a decade touring and releasing three albums with the band Deep Chatham. Since then his room silencing solo act has become an exciting yet poorly kept secret in DIY music scenes around the country. After The Flood will be his first full-length release showcasing a songwriting ability that audiences, distracted by his casually virtuosic musicianship, might have previously overlooked. Don’t wait for his next reinvention, find Matt Heckler now and remember what music should be.
LEON MAJCEN + BRYAN ELIJAH SMITH + SZLACHETKA
Jun 28 @ 9:00 pm

Leon Majcen is an acoustic singer/songwriter from Clearwater, FL, whose original songs are listened to on a daily basis by a national audience on SiriusXM’s The Coffee House channel.
Leon first got his start by playing at local open mic nights at coffeeshops and bars in the area. After writing his first song at only ten years old, he continues to write and produce his material while constantly developing his sound and image. With a rapidly growing fan-base, Leon humbly continues to pursue his passion by performing at various Tampa Bay locales and writing meaningful, heartfelt lyrics that relate to real life experiences of his and others around him.
With just his voice and guitar, Leon Majcen’s charming melody has drawn comparisons to the works of John Mayer and The Lumineers as well as Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash.

Bryan Elijah Smith

Their unique sound defined by their raw energy & Smith’s unbashedly genuine songwriting & voice makes this band one worth not only listening to but experiencing live. Completely independent of any outside label or management, they are a self-produced well oiled machine. They even wrote this bio.

Smith has opened for such acts as Nathan Moore, The Barr Brothers (at Rockwood Music Hall in NYC), Paul Curreri, Trent Wagler, Fastball, Emmitt-Nershi Band and Corey Smith (at Wilson Hall in Harrisonburg, VA). Smith has also jammed/performed with Steve Kimock, Zach Gill (of ALO & Jack Johnson’s band), Greensky Bluegrass, Brock Butler (of Perpetual Groove), Trevor Garrod & Reed Mathis (of Tea Leaf Green), Hot Buttered Rum and Pimps of Joytime on Jam Cruise 9 & 11. Smith has a catalog of over 500 original songs, has released 7 full legnth albums since October 2009 & has performed up and down the entire East Coast as well as in Roatan Honduras.

Smith & the Wilds Hearts have opened for Langhorne Slim & David Mayfield Parade (at The Jefferson Theater in Charlottesville, VA), Trampled by Turtles & Old Crow Medicine Show on the Dreaming Creek Main Stage at FloydFest X, Trevor Hall, Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Sons of Bill & The Steel Wheels.

The latest album, Turn It Up, was recorded like they did back in the 60’s. Released on October 3rd, 2012, ‘Turn It Up’ consists of 11 original Alternative-Americana tracks written & produced by Bryan Elijah Smith. The Wild Hearts, consisting of Jeff Miller on piano, banjo & vox, Justin Shifflett on drums & Tyler Reardon on bass, helped fuel the fire behind this record with their raw energy & distinguishable sound. Recorded, engineered & mixed by Bryan Elijah Smith at Empty Sound Productions in Dayton, VA. Mastered by Brian Lucey at Magic Garden Mastering (The Shins, Lera Lynn, The Black Keys, Ryan Bingham & Eric Clapton).

Szlachetka

The sophomore album from Rolling Stone “Artist to Watch,” SZLACHETKA (pronounced SLA-HET-KA) was released February 16, 2018. With its mix of modern Americana, 70s California rock, and singer/songwriter sentiments, Heart of My Hometown is a classic record for the contemporary world. Singer/songwriter Szlachetka co-wrote the 11 songs for his record while on the road—finding breaks during a busy two-year period that saw him playing roughly 400 shows. Traveling alone, he kept an eye on the world unrolling outside his car window. The sights, sounds, and stories he encountered along the way eventually found their way into his own music, resulting in a hook-filled, guitar-driven record about highways, homes, and the people who fill both. 

Years before he teamed up with Grammy-winning producer David Bianco (Tom Petty, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Lucinda Williams) for the Heart of My Hometown sessions, Szlachetka was the frontman of acclaimed LA-based roots-rock band the Northstar Session. With the band, he recorded five albums and appeared in NBC’s TV series Parenthood. He began his solo career in 2014 releasing Waits for a Storm to Find. Three years later, Heart of My Hometown shines new light on Szlachetka as a singer, prolific songwriter, storyteller, and fiery lead guitarist. It’s an album whose touchstones include the charged roots-rock of Tom Petty and the warm, acoustic sounds of Jackson Browne. Szlachetka moves between both ends of that spectrum with ease, splitting his time between full-band anthems — including the riff-heavy ‘Until That Echo,’ co-written with Train’s Scott Underwood — and more intimate, acoustic moments like ‘Wildflowers on the Highway,’ featuring an appearance by duet partner Katelyn Clampett. The album’s title track rests somewhere in the middle, layering pop hooks and three-part harmonies into a nostalgic song about remembering one’s roots. It’s an album built for road trips, slow dances, wild Friday nights, and everything in between. 

Rolling Stone hailed Szlachetka as one of the 10 New Artists You Need to Know, describing his forthcoming album as ‘a soundtrack for both the highway and the heartland…a collection of road-dog roots-rockers and Americana ballads inspired by the people (and places) he’s left behind in the rearview mirror.’ Now based in Nashville, Szlachetka continues to tour nationally with a schedule that’s seen him open for Brandy Clark, the Byrds’ Chris Hillman, the Heartbreakers’ Mike Campbell, Brandi Carlile and more.

Jun
29
Sat
Oshima Brothers
Jun 29 @ 7:30 pm
Oshima Brothers

Oshima Brothers

Oshima Brothers’ magnetic sibling sound and contagious joy result from a lifetime of making music together. Raised in a musical family in rural Maine, the brothers have honed a harmony-rich blend of contemporary folk and acoustic pop. On stage, Sean and Jamie create a surprisingly full sound with dynamic vocals, electric and acoustic guitars, octave bass, loops, and percussion. Their debut album, ‘Oshima Brothers,’ released in 2016, is a collection of 11 original songs written by Sean, and arranged and recorded by Jamie. The brothers live in Maine but are often on the road performing, producing music videos, and dancing.
Jun
30
Sun
KRISTIN HERSH – Electric Trio Show with Fred Abong
Jun 30 @ 8:00 pm
KRISTIN HERSH – Electric Trio Show

KRISTIN HERSH - Electric Trio Show

Influential songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, Kristin Hersh, leader of the indie rock band, Throwing Muses and the noise rock power trio, 50 Foot Wave, is on the road with her highly acclaimed Fire Records release, “Possible Dust Clouds.” The touring trio is a hard hitting super group: Fred Abong, bass player from Throwing Muses (who opens solo, promoting his new ep, “Pulsing”) and Rob Ahlers, drummer of 50 Foot Wave. These electric trio shows are loud, tight and intense, featuring material from across Kristin’s thirty year career.

“Kristin Hersh is a musical genius” — Huffington Post

“A fearless rock innovator” — New York Times

“Possible Dust Clouds finds a kind of euphoria in its state of emergency” — Financial Times

“Possible Dust Clouds reinforces that Kristin Hersh is not just persevering in the now but flourishing as she makes some of the finest music of her career” — The Vinyl District

“The work of an artist both singular and shape-shifting, always herself but never predictable” — Uncut

“The portal to Hersh’s carefully documented world of otherness” — Mojo

“A stunning, stealthy, faintly malevolent collection of songs” — Q
“Possible Dust Clouds is her finest body of work to date. Dazzling and always fantastically bewildering.” — Drowned In Sound

Fred Abong

Fred Abong

Fred Abong is a singer/songwriter and one time bass player for the influential art-punk band Throwing Muses and the Grammy nominated alt-rock band Belly.

Prior to that, Fred was active as a drummer and bass player in numerous bands centered on the Newport RI hardcore punk scene. 

In addition to playing music, Fred earned his Ph.D in Humanities in 2016.

Jul
5
Fri
LITTLE TYBEE
Jul 5 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Little Tybee’s eponymous self titled 4th studio album is by far the group’s most ambitious work, and fully crystallizes the Atlanta sextet’s brand of dynamic and multi-layered dream folk. Named for a small island off the coast of Georgia, Little Tybee have been a mainstay in Atlanta’s burgeoning music scene since they formed in 2009. The group has developed a cult following for their celebrated live sets, and have opened for acts including Victor Wooten, Kurt Vile, Of Montreal, Maps and Atlases, Hundred Waters and many more. Little Tybee “have been developing their genre bending sound over the course of nearly seven years, three albums, and countless tours across the States,” and according to Vice’s Noisey, “it’s time to start paying attention.”

The bulk of the Little Tybee’s compositions begin their life as delicate creations, etched around the sinewy acoustic guitar and lilting vocals of singer songwriter and band leader Brock Scott. The songs are then fleshed out by the eight-string guitar virtuoso Josh Martin (endorsed by Ibanez & Dunlop), the classical flare of Nirvana Kelly’s violin, the deep pocket grooves of Ryan Donald’s hook-laden bass and Pat Brook’s gospel tinged beats, all rounded out by Chris Case’s driving keyboard arrangements. The result is kinetic and eclectic, an album which is both soothing and bombastic, and which rewards repeat listens. By blending elements of Folk, Psych, Jazz, and Bossa, Little Tybee have created a genre all their own, both creative and technical, with a keen ear for melody and accessibility.

EVENT DETAILS:

  • When: Friday, July 5
  • Time: 7:00pm – 10:00pm
  • Location: River Jam Stage
  • Cost: Free and open to the public
  • Weather: Events are scheduled to proceed rain or shine.  In the event of severe weather, the USNWC reserves the right to reschedule/cancel live music performances.
Jul
11
Thu
SAM BURCHFIELD
Jul 11 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Sam Burchfield is a southern folk / soul artist out of Atlanta, GA. Lyrical depth paired with a soulful vocal delivery and catchy melodies drives home the message. Burchfield transports listeners into a wide array of musical truths, commanding the stage with a joyful honesty.  His latest EP, Unarmored, digs a few layers deeper into a genre-crossing career that has only just begun. From folk, to funk, to southern soul — Sam and his band of ‘Scoundrels’ capture it all. The rowdy crew puts on a show that is electrifyingly entertaining and yet full of Burchfield’s lyrical honesty and depth.

EVENT DETAILS:

  • When: Thursday, July 11
  • Time: 7:00pm – 10:00pm
  • Location: River Jam Stage
  • Cost: Free and open to the public
  • Weather: Events are scheduled to proceed rain or shine.  In the event of severe weather, the USNWC reserves the right to reschedule/cancel live music performances.
The Wood Brothers
Jul 11 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

“It’s the freest album we’ve done, the most independent album we’ve done, and was the most fun we’ve ever had making a record,” says Oliver Wood. “And most importantly, this is the most purely Wood Brothers’ album we’ve ever made.”

Indeed, The Wood Brothers’ sixth outing, ‘One Drop of Truth,’ dives headfirst into a deep wellspring of sounds, styles and influences. Whereas their previous outings have often followed a conceptual and sonic through-line, here the long-standing trio featuring brothers Oliver and Chris Wood along with Jano Rix treat each song as if it were its own short film. The plaintive, country-folk of the album’s opening track “River Takes The Town” gives way to the The Band-esque Americana soul of “Happiness Jones.” The wistful ballad “Strange As It Seems” floats on a cloud of stream of consciousness, standing in stark contrast to “Sky High”—a Saturday night barnburner built upon stinging slide guitar funk. “Seasick Emotions” is rife with turmoil, yet “Sparking Wine” is jaunty and carefree. The end result is undeniably The Wood Brothers’ most dynamic recording to date.

Jul
12
Fri
WOOD AND WIRE
Jul 12 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

The Texas songwriter tradition casts a long shadow today, and Austin-based Americana roots juggernauts Wood & Wire could easily rattle off a long list of songwriters that inspire them from Willie Nelson to James McMurtry, and everyone in between. But ask them about what it is about Texas that brought us so many great songwriters, and they stop cold. That’s because they don’t romanticize their culture or their past, they’re too busy working their asses off making new music, writing new songs. This isn’t a land made for quiet reflection, it’s a land made for hard work. Respect for honest labor is a central theme in Wood & Wire’s 2018 GRAMMY Nominated album for “Best Bluegrass”, North of Despair ( Blue Corn Music), with songs populated by people like songwriter Tony Kamel’s own grandfather, who built the family’s hunting lodge in Llano, Texas with his own two hands. The characters on the album live large, and aren’t afraid to share their opinions about the modern world. This kind of vivid, haunting songwriting focused on lives spent deep in the countryside is a hallmark of Texas songwriting. But it’s the melding of this hard country songwriting with high-octane bluegrass instrumentation that makes for Wood & Wire’s signature sound. Artists like John Hartford have trod this ground before, mixing up great songs, bluegrass virtuosity, and a strong sense of place, and Wood & Wire aim to pave the way for Austin’s roots scene, bursting out of the giant expanses of the state with a fully-fledged vision for a new Texan sound. On North of Despair, they bring the ferocity of their live shows to the studio, whipping through barn-burning anthems about hard people in hard times.

EVENT DETAILS:

  • When: Friday, July 12
  • Time: 7:00pm – 10:00pm
  • Location: River Jam Stage
  • Cost: Free and open to the public
  • Weather: Events are scheduled to proceed rain or shine.  In the event of severe weather, the USNWC reserves the right to reschedule/cancel live music performances.
Jul
13
Sat
C2 & THE BROTHERS REED
Jul 13 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Hailing from Kentucky with a sound as unique and smooth as the state’s beloved bourbon, C2 & The Brothers Reed’s authenticity shines – in their music, and on stage.

After the independent release of their first EP “Hot Mess”, along with an extensive tour schedule (250+ shows in 2015-16) traveling mainly in the southern part of the country, they took to the studio less than a year later to cut their new record Weigh Station Tour. Split into sides, ‘Exit A’ and ‘Exit B’, Weigh Station Tourexplores gritty rock and roll while referencing 60’s and 70’s era soul music, embracing a style that is nearly lost but deeply needed in the surge of modern sound and technology.

EVENT DETAILS:

  • When: Saturday, July 13
  • Time: 7:00pm – 10:00pm
  • Location: River Jam Stage
  • Cost: Free and open to the public
  • Weather: Events are scheduled to proceed rain or shine.  In the event of severe weather, the USNWC reserves the right to reschedule/cancel live music performances.
Jul
18
Thu
Thursdays Live music series
Jul 18 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

You’re invited to Thursdays Live – free live music, cold beer, food from Hawthorne’s NY Pizza and refreshments from 6 until 8pm. It’s happening all summer, the 3rd Thursday of each month. Come hang out with your MoRA neighbors! At the new Embrace sculpture, located at the intersection of Monroe Rd and Conference Dr.  Here’s a short video from last year:  https://youtu.be/n_kkmLDi2zc

DANGERMUFFIN
Jul 18 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Charleston, SC’s Dangermuffin is an eclectic quartet that weaves lyrical themes of sea, sun, and spiritual connection with Americana, Island influenced, Folk and Jam grooves. The band’s live show swims between tasty acoustic, and rockin’ electric sounds. On the band’s 6th and latest release, ‘Heritage,’ Dangermuffin reaches into their creative arsenal to craft an album showcasing the band’s signature coastal-influenced grooves mixed with Americana sensibilities and Appalachian fingerpicking. The album’s lyrics contemplate the universal human connection to our ancestors, ancient traditions and symbols while yearning for humanity to get back to its roots. It is an audible showcase weaving introspective lyrics with catchy, nimble guitar riffs. Fittingly, the album’s soaring vocals were recorded in Charleston’s historic Unitarian Church, a National Historic Landmark built in 1772.

EVENT DETAILS:

  • When: Thursday, July 18
  • Time: 7:00pm – 10:00pm
  • Location: Belmont Abbey College Island
  • Cost: Free and open to the public
  • Weather: This event will proceed rain or shine
Jul
21
Sun
Natalie Royal w/ Raymond Joseph
Jul 21 @ 4:00 pm
Natalie Royal

Natalie Royal

Self-proclaimed “gut folk” songwriter/artist, Natalie Royal, has been writing and performing since she was in elementary school. In 2009, she made the move from Charlotte, NC to Nashville, TN to pursue a Bachelor of Arts in Songwriting at Belmont University. She released her sophomore album, Harbinger, in 2016, and with several fresh tunes in her repertoire, she plans to hit the studio again later this year. When she’s not writing songs, Royal enjoys cooking, starting (and finishing) jigsaw puzzles, and reading historical fiction novels.
 
Raymond Joseph

Raymond Joseph

‘Using a delicate voice and intricate arrangements, Nashville’s Raymond Joseph spins life’s most complicated sentiments into quietly powerful songs that waver between fragility and catharsis.’
Jul
27
Sat
JARED & THE MILL
Jul 27 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

We’re 5 best friends from Arizona. We love the desert, we love its mountains, we love our city, its people, and we love each other. We love long drives, early mornings, late nights, dive bars, carne asada Tacos at 3 am, dirty jokes, and asking each other what we think about things. We’re just as likely to get down on Simon & Garfunkel and Bob Dylan as we are Van Halen, Kendrick Lamar, and The Weeknd. We love dogs, we love our van, we love playing music together, and we love you – it’s true. For the past few years, we’ve released records and pretty much always been on tour, hitting the road on our own, with fellow bands, and have been lucky enough to open for a few heroes. From living rooms and basement clubs, to theaters and arenas, we just love playing shows, and truly love being on the road.

Our fans (the pack) are our greatest priority – we love them, we really do, and we do our best to insure them that we can’t do this without them. Our message is one of acceptance, not in a circle sitting kumbaya way, but in a way of acknowledging that we all have things we regret, we all have passions and opinions, and it’s up to all of us to filter through our flaws and our regrets to find ourselves and love one another. Don’t judge other people, do your best to have a good time in life, and care about everybody, like EVERYBODY everybody. Our shows are rowdy, you’ll break down your walls and realize you’re not in this alone. We hope you come to a show, make our songs apart of your story, and live the best life you can.

Cheers,

Jared & The Mill

EVENT DETAILS:

  • When: Saturday, July 27
  • Time: 7:00pm – 10:00pm
  • Location: River Jam Stage
  • Cost: Free and open to the public
  • Weather: Events are scheduled to proceed rain or shine.  In the event of severe weather, the USNWC reserves the right to reschedule/cancel live music performances.
Aug
15
Thu
Thursdays Live music series
Aug 15 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

You’re invited to Thursdays Live – free live music, cold beer, food from Hawthorne’s NY Pizza and refreshments from 6 until 8pm. It’s happening all summer, the 3rd Thursday of each month. Come hang out with your MoRA neighbors! At the new Embrace sculpture, located at the intersection of Monroe Rd and Conference Dr.  Here’s a short video from last year:  https://youtu.be/n_kkmLDi2zc

Aug
31
Sat
THE CONTENDERS
Aug 31 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

The Contenders are an Americana Folk Roots duo of Jay Nash (9 albums, 10 EPs, 900 shows, 400,000 miles) and Josh Day (Sara Bareilles, John Oates, Brandi Clark, and Jennifer Nettles drummer) they have toured the US, opened for The Milk Carton Kids half a dozen times, played Americana Fest with Patti Griffin, played Merle Fest where Jens Kruger of the Kruger Brothers joined them onstage, toured Europe (Holland, Germany, and France) have released an EP ‘Meet The Contenders’ and released their debut Album ‘Laughing with the Reckless’ last year to critical acclaim.

EVENT DETAILS:

  • When: Saturday, August 31
  • Time: 7:00pm – 10:00pm
  • Location: River Jam Stage
  • Cost: Free and open to the public
  • Weather: Events are scheduled to proceed rain or shine.  In the event of severe weather, the USNWC reserves the right to reschedule/cancel live music performances.
Sep
5
Thu
WINSTON RAMBLE
Sep 5 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Based in Florence, AL, Winston Ramble describes their music as homegrown folk n’ roll.  With members originally hailing from the free state of Winston County, AL, the band aims to interject the raw expression of rock n’ roll into the feel good vibes of acoustic music.

“At the end of the day, we want people to have a good time when they hear our music.  We want it to make you smile, sing along, nod your head, stomp your feet, or get down and groove – and that’s because we feel that way about the music we play, and we love playing it.  That attitude and energy is contagious, and hard to resist.”

EVENT DETAILS:

  • When: Thursday, September 5
  • Time: 7:00pm – 10:00pm
  • Location: River Jam Stage
  • Cost: Free and open to the public
  • Weather: Events are scheduled to proceed rain or shine.  In the event of severe weather, the USNWC reserves the right to reschedule/cancel live music performances.
Sep
18
Wed
Keb’ Mo’ – Solo Acoustic
Sep 18 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Over the years, Keb’ Mo’ has proven that he is a musical force that defies typical genre labels. Album after album, 14 in total, garnered him 4 GRAMMY awards and a producer/engineer/artist GRAMMY Certificate for his track on the 2001 Country Album of the Year, Hank Williams Tribute — Timeless. Over the past two decades, Keb’ has cultivated a reputation as a modern master of American roots music through the understated excellence of his live and studio performances.

In 2017, Keb’ Mo’ released TajMo, a collaborative album with the legendary Taj Mahal. The multigenerational duo went on to tour the US and Europe in support of their album; which has since earned a GRAMMY Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album.

‘Life Is Beautiful’ Keb’ Mo’ Meet & Greet Experience

  • One (1) premium reserved seat in the first (5) rows
  • Meet & greet / photo opportunity with Keb’ Mo’
  • One (1) merchandise gift autographed by Keb’ Mo’
  • Dedicated and early venue entry for merchandise shopping
Sep
19
Thu
Thursdays Live music series
Sep 19 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

You’re invited to Thursdays Live – free live music, cold beer, food from Hawthorne’s NY Pizza and refreshments from 6 until 8pm. It’s happening all summer, the 3rd Thursday of each month. Come hang out with your MoRA neighbors! At the new Embrace sculpture, located at the intersection of Monroe Rd and Conference Dr.  Here’s a short video from last year:  https://youtu.be/n_kkmLDi2zc

Oct
5
Sat
The Kingston Trio
Oct 5 @ 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm

All three current members, Mike Marvin, Tim Gorelangton and Don Marovich, have intrinsic links to and experience with the original group: Mike is the adopted son of founding member Nick Reynolds, who was also his musical mentor; Tim, a close friend since boyhood, is one of the few musicians outside the Trio who has recorded with Nick Reynolds; and Don Marovich, who has performed with the Trio and who plays the guitar, banjo and mandolin. Many of their personal memories recall the iconic trio’s performances and journey as folk music made its extraordinary ascent to the pinnacle of popular culture – and the top of the music charts.

Nov
7
Thu
The SiriusXM Coffeehouse Tour featuring Joshua Radin & The Weepies
Nov 7 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Share in an evening of indie-Americana with singer-songwriters Joshua Radin and Deb Talan and Steve Tannen of The Weepies. These musicians explore the intricacies and adventures of love with distinctive sentiment and exceptional lyricism.

About Joshua Radin

Love and the complications surrounding it have long been Joshua Radin’s songwriting forte. Featured in more than 150 different films, commercials and TV shows, Radin’s songs have reached large audiences with their ability to convey all of the ambivalence and excited uncertainness of new love.

About The Weepies

Deb Talan and Steve Tannen began writing songs together the night they met. Soon after, they formed The Weepies, an indie junket launched by the now husband-wife duo’s harmonies and insightful songwriting. Their charming performance style and prolific work ethic have led to the sale of more than 1.5 million records and fans across the globe.