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Oct
17
Thu
An Evening With Songs From the Road Band
Oct 17 @ 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm

Songs From The Road Band is a North Carolina based quartet featuring Mark Schimick, Charles Humphrey, Sam Wharton, and James Schlender. Collectively, they have received top accolades in the bluegrass, Americana, and jazz genres. The band is currently touring in support of their fourth studio album, Road To Nowhere.

Humphrey is an IBMA award and Grammy winning performer and producer. He is a NC Music Hall of Fame member. Schimick has soared to the top of the progressive and jamgrass scene alongside legends Larry Keel, Vassar Clements, and Tony Rice. James Schlender, 2 time National Fiddle Champion has shared the stage with Chick Corea, Bobby McFerrin, and George Benson. Originally from Alabama, Sam Wharton is an award winning guitar player and vocalist that honed his chops in the bluegrass halls of Telluride, CO! The Road Band delivers a high energy show full of original material from their 4 studio albums, unmatched instrumental prowess, and creative covers!

*Petra’s is a private club and a valid ID is required for entry. You will be expected to pay a $1 annual fee if you are not already a member with us.

Oct
18
Fri
Eliot Bronson with Tom Mackell
Oct 18 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm
Eliot Bronson is like a gorgeous, magnificent hybrid of Adams, Jason Isbell, and Jim James.

Picture a street in working-class Baltimore some 30 years ago. Kids play in the shadows of the row houses that line the sidewalks. Their parents sit on the stoops leading up to front doors. It all seems normal at first glance.

 

But zoom in on one of these homes — that old duplex built back when this part of town was still mainly open fields. Inside is a completely different community, where fundamentalism, hippie values and volatile, unpredictable emotions coexist and collide. Escape is difficult: the only way out is to pass through the bedrooms of people you might be trying to get away from.

 

This is where Eliot Bronson grew up. Yeah, he often wanted to slip away from there, but the first thing he saw once he exited was the Pentecostal Church across the street where his father and grandfather had preached and where congregants spoke in tongues.

 

So Eliot looked inward instead.

 

“For better or worse, I’ve always been a weirdo,” he remembers. “I was reading about Zen Buddhism when all my friends were getting high and drunk in high school.

 

“Of course,” he adds, “I did all that stuff later.”

 

He also observed. In this kaleidoscopic family, where glossolalia and, on occasion, alcohol-fueled ravings, sometimes bled into each other, Bronson found shelter in music. At age 15, he got his first guitar and started teaching himself to play. “Right away, I wanted to write my own songs,” he says. “My house was pretty chaotic, crazy, and unhealthy, so I took to music like it was a life raft. It was something I could do to keep myself alive.”

 

Punk rock was his shelter at first. Then one day his dad put on a few of his favorite LPs — Bob Dylan’s The Times They Are A-Changin’, something by Brownie McGhee and Sonny Terry. Eliot had heard these albums a thousand times before. This time, though…

 

“… it resonated with me,” Eliot says. “It wasn’t just in the background. I tuned into it for the first time. There was a magic and a power there. It didn’t talk down to the listener but it was also high art. It asked you to be smart and to become a better version of yourself. For me, this was a moment when it became my music, not just my parents’ music.”

 

From local coffee houses and venues beyond Baltimore, Bronson sharpened his writing and performance. He cultivated a working approach that involved singing to himself as ideas came to him and never jotting down chord changes or lyrics once he had committed the finished version to memory. A local following grew. Astute observers saw something different in the young artist’s work. The Baltimore Sun even anointed him “a folk singing wunderkind.”

 

Expanding his range, Bronson toured as one-half of a duo. They moved to Atlanta and picked up a gig in a room frequented by The Indigo Girls, John Mayer, Shawn Mullins and other discerning clientele. When his partner quit to take a sensible non-musical job, Bronson persisted on his own. His songs won first-place honors at MerleFest’s Chris Austin Songwriting Contest and Eddie Owens Presents “Songwriter Shootout.” He issued several solo albums, including a self-titled release in 2014 that prompted Glide Magazine to describe him as “a gorgeous, magnificent hybrid of (Ryan) Adams, Jason Isbell and Jim James.” Bop n Jazz upped that ante by heralding him as “maybe the best singer/songwriter since Dylan.”

 

Writers may have trouble topping these accolades, though that’s what Bronson’s latest album merits. Scheduled to release Aug. 25 on Rock Ridge Music, James offers songs that are more like pictures than movies, capturing moments and digging deeply into their meanings. A stomping beat, raw harmonica and searing electric slide drives the opening track, “Breakdown In G Major,” followed by a selection of songs that only confirm Bronson’s restless, escalating excellence.

 

“Good Enough,” for example, captures a relationship in its final stage — a stage that may end tomorrow or stretch on for years. Bronson sings it sorrowfully, asking the rhetorical question of whether “‘good enough’ is good enough for you” from this point. “When I stumbled onto that line, I was like, ‘That’ll probably stick,’” he says. “But I think the song really came from the first line, ‘Were we really that young?’ Sometimes it takes just one line to resonate with me and get me to start writing.”

 

Then there’s “The Mountain,” whose elusive grandeur delivers a powerful message but leaves it to the listener to parse its meaning. “There’s a very literalist current in writing and music right now,” Bronson observes. “There aren’t a lot of layers to lyrics these days. It’s just what you see on the page. So when you don’t write that way, you get, ‘What are you hiding?’”

 

He laughs and then concludes, “I don’t look at it that way. For me, it’s more about how you feel when you hear it. What does it do for you? That’s the message!”

 

One more, “Rough Ride,” is a departure for Bronson. Here, the meaning is clear: When 25-year-old Freddie Gray fell unaccountably into a coma in the back of a Baltimore police van, much of America expressed shock and outrage. So did Bronson, but he channeled those emotions into this song.

 

“I had mixed feelings about writing this because I don’t like inserting my political or social beliefs into art,” he explains. “Art should be about connecting people, not drawing lines between them. But I was listening to Dylan’s Desire album at the time, especially ‘Hurricane.’ I always wanted to write a song like that. It was like, ‘How can you tell a story almost journalistically with great emotional impact and yet not come off heavy-handed?’ I wanted to see if I could do it. Now I’m glad I did.”

 

Known for his empathetic work with Sturgill Simpson, Chris Stapleton, Jason Isbell and other utterly original artists, producer Dave Cobb played a critical role in bringing James to fruition. “His honesty and old-fashioned vibe were so appealing to me,” Bronson says. “They leant themselves to the way I created. And, of course, it was a huge boost to have this great artist/producer at your back.”

 

They had worked together previously on his 2014 release, Eliot Bronson. “But this album is different,” Bronson points out. “It’s more sparse and economical. My voice is stronger. And I think it’s a step away from the purely Americana vibe of the last one in a direction that I have a hard time defining. I’m excited to discover how this music will define itself.”

 

Wherever he’s bound, Bronson promises to write and sing the truth as he sees and feels it. “For the really great artists, like Dylan or Paul Simon, you never quite find what you’re looking for,” he says. “As you get closer, it changes. It stays elusive. What I want to do now isn’t the same as what I wanted to do five years ago. And that’s what keeps me going.” And it’s that shift that drives Bronson to continue to refine his art.

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Tom Mackell

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Tom Mackell might surprise listeners with the southern influences in his music. After attending college in the south, he made the necessary pilgrimage to Nashville in 2015 to find inspiration, collaborate with diverse artists, and build his unique voice and sound that juxtaposes Northern roots against traditional Southern sounds. Tom’s style is as diverse as it is accessible, from easy listening, beachy tunes to late-night tailgate jams. Tom is no stranger to the road: he has toured across the nation with Sister Hazel as well as The Voice alumnus Tony Lucca. Tom co-wrote “Restless Heart” off Lucca’s new record “Ain’t No Storm” which hit #3 on the iTunes Singer-Songwriter chart in March 2019. Now calling Charleston home, Tom has a brand new EP titled “A Life I Once Knew” that will surely become a go-to record for any Americana, country, and acoustic music fan. Listen now at tommackell.com.

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ELIZABETH COOK + WILL HOGE
Oct 18 @ 8:00 pm

ELIZABETH COOK

Elizabeth Cook is a Nashville-based Singer Songwriter from Wildwood, Florida. As a critically acclaimed live act and recording artist, the New York Times lauds her “a sharp and surprising country singer”. A veteran SiriusXM Outlaw Country Radio DJ, hosting her own show, Apron Strings, nationwide for the last 10 years, she is also a favorite of David Letterman, a regular performer on the Grand Ole Opry, and a frequent guest star on Adult Swim’s long-running hit cartoon series “Squidbillies” on Cartoon Network.

In the words of the Drivin’ and Cryin’s legendary Kevn Kinney, “Elizabeth is so far ahead and under the radar you better have a supercharger for that fastback if you’re going to catch up! Enjoy the ride…”

WILL HOGE

MY AMERICAN DREAM … “Will Hoge didn’t really need to release a new album in 2018. His most recent, Anchors, came out last August, reaching No. 6 on Billboard Heatseekers and the Top 20 on the Indie chart. He’d toured the United States and Europe, and could’ve settled in from there. But there was something he couldn’t stop thinking about: his children.

Border police. Political corruption. Anti-intellectualism. Poverty. Gun control. A broken education system. Indifference to others’ suffering. Each of these things weighed on Hoge, and he confronts them all head-on in My American Dream, which will come with a copy of the U.S. Constitution printed with the lyrics in both the LP and CD (out October 5th on Edlo/Thirty Tigers).

“Those things kept me up at night — and this record was less expensive than therapy,” he says, laughing. “Silence couldn’t be a part of my deal anymore.” and Hoge dealt with his fears the only way he knows how, by making music. The result is the fiercest, angriest, and most heartfelt collection of songs he’s released. Eight songs of rabble-rousing political commentary that turns a critical eye on the crisis of conscience and culture threatening to tear apart his country, the album is Hoge’s impassioned portrait of what he holds dear — and what we all might risk losing.

“My kids and their future, that’s the biggest thing for me. My boys are 11 and 7, they’re happy and healthy kids, and I feel lucky for that every day,” says Hoge, who’s wife is a teacher at the same school that their sons attend in Nashville, Tennessee. “Every morning at 7 o’clock, everything I care about in the world goes to one building. It takes one knucklehead with a gun going into that one building to ruin all that for me.”

The first song that Hoge completed was inspired directly by the specter of school shootings and the inept response of politicians: “Thoughts & Prayers” (released as a single and named as one of the Top 25 Songs of 2017 by Rolling Stone Country) is an acoustic ballad in which he asks, “Why don’t you do your job up there? Keep your thoughts and prayers.” “Sadly, it seems that “thoughts and prayers” is America’s new slogan” says RS. It’s a raw, fiery song with just Hoge and his guitar, belting out his frustrations in the recording booth. Production wise, It’s a stark contrast to the straight, no-holds-barred rock and roll of the rest of the album, though the inextinguishable spirit remains the same throughout and the urgency of the music comes through in every note.

Hoge drives home the sentiment on the searing album opener “Gilded Walls”.

“Well another group of kids in high school dead

But you’re still at your golf course teeing off at nine

People marching in the streets trying to find a little peace

You sit around spouting more bullsh*t online”

Listen to the thumping beat of “Nikki’s a Republican Now” or the crunchy solidarity of “Stupid Kids” and it’s clear Hoge feels the release of cranking the amps up to 11. Hoge credits the big rock sound on My American Dream, to the red hot playing of his touring band and the intense angst caused by what’s happening in our country. With Will in the producers chair, he along with Thom Donavan (lead guitar), Chris Griffiths (bass) and Allen Jones (drums) hunkered down in Studio B at Nashville’s historic Sound Emporium and knocked out the entire album in just 3 days. He then enlisted long time trusted collaborator and Grammy Award winning engineer, Ray Kennedy, to handle the final mixes.

Hoge has never been afraid to wade into political territory, like with 2004’s The America EP (“Bible Vs. Gun,” “Hey Mr. President (Anyone But You)”) or 2012’s Modern American Protest Music (“Ballad of Trayvon Martin,” “Jesus Came to Tennessee”) and the point of this new material is to continue to push Hoge — and his listeners — even further outside of the comfort zone. That meant coming to terms with parts of his own past that he wasn’t proud of. When speaking about the song “Still a Southern Man”, Hoge notes “I grew up in a town where the high school mascot, the Franklin Rebels, had a rebel flag. I was the guy that brought the rebel flag to football games. I thought it was awesome because it was our school,” he remembers. “I was a dumb, small-town, sheltered kid. It never entered my mind that this was racist because I wasn’t racist, so how could this be wrong? I never considered the dark history, It was just a mascot to me, I realized later It was a long, awful nightmare to many others.”

More often than not, though, Hoge puts himself in someone else’s shoes, be it the homeless heartland worker who watched his job prospects head overseas on “My American Dream” or the Mexican immigrant crossing the border to provide for his family on “Illegal Line.” At their core, both songs are about empathy. “At the end of the day, that’s really what folks are after, is just to be treated with some respect. Paired back to back, “My American Dream” and “Illegal Line” form the emotional core of the album, with the latter song taking on all the more significance in light of the heartbreaking separation of families so tragically revealed in the 24-hour news cycle.

He’s grateful for the commercial success and Grammy nominations that songs such as “Even if It Breaks Your Heart” “Middle of America” and “Strong” have received, but even more important than the commercial success is the freedom to stand up for his convictions and put them into his music when the time calls for it. ”If I’m going to alienate folks then I guess it’s doing its job. If they aren’t willing to be challenged, if they don’t like the songs, then don’t buy the record. It’s that simple.”

What’s more, Hoge isn’t the type to talk the talk without walking the walk. He’s an avid activist, lending his time and resources to raise awareness and money for Believe in Service (a Nashville based PAC who supports candidates in 8 key Senate races) and is a member of Everytown for Gun Safety’s Music Council, a part of the Creative Council, founded and chaired by Julianne Moore. His social media pages are a microcosm of sorts for the wider conversations taking place in the world today, as he challenges his fans to not shy away from the important questions that need to be asked.

With My American Dream, Hoge hopes that others will follow his lead, see the world through someone else’s eyes, and maybe — just maybe — begin to fix the mess we’re living in.

Oct
20
Sun
THE BLACK LILLIES with DAVID TAYLOR AND THE TALLBOYS
Oct 20 @ 8:00 pm

Known for their captivating blend of rock & roll and country, The Black Lillies have become one of Americana music’s biggest success stories: an internationally-renowned band of roots-rockers, armed with songs that blur the boundaries between genres. They are a mainstay on radio and album sales charts, with a sound that is as powerful in the quieter moments as it is explosive during the jubilant ones. The band’s pared down configuration has resulted in a bigger, deeper sound built on undeniable chemistry, lush three-part harmonies, and instrumental virtuosity with a funky edge.  

Their new album Stranger to Me was an immediate critical and fan success, debuting at #5 on the Billboard Folk/Americana chart, #9 on the Billboard Current Country chart, and #61 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums chart – no small feat for a band that eschews record labels in order to remain independent and in control of their sound. And what a sound it is: built on the foundation of the familiar roots rock of some of the greatest bands of the past, but altogether fresh, modern, sharp; swirling with psychedelic overtones, torch ballad longing, and an indie rock edge.

www.theblacklillies.com

DAVID TAYLOR AND THE TALLBOYS

Start Time: 8:00

David Taylor has nothing to do with the fact that he has a band; he just got lucky one night. Having been a solo singer/song-writer for several years in the Charlotte music scene, David has built up quite the catalog of songs. He has performed throughout the Charlotte area, and he self-released a solo EP titled Texas Heat in July 2018.

David Taylor & The Tallboys were born after several beers and an impromptu jam session on a Monday night with the help of friends Gersh Godwin on bass, and Jason Cline on lead guitar. Wes Hamilton joined the party on pedal steel guitar, and Matt Sloop filled out the lineup on drums. The Tallboys take David’s songs and turn them into twangy rock-n-roll tunes that make you want to dance, stomp your feet, and cry at the same time. 

Despite only having been a band since early 2019, David Taylor & The Tallboys have already started making waves in the music scene. They have played at local festivals, house parties, and venues such as The Evening Muse, Snug Harbor, and The Pour House.

Known for their captivating blend of rock & roll and country, The Black Lillies have become one of Americana music’s biggest success stories: an internationally-renowned band of roots-rockers, armed with songs that blur the boundaries between genres. They are a mainstay on radio and album sales charts, with a sound that is as powerful in the quieter moments as it is explosive during the jubilant ones. The band’s pared down configuration has resulted in a bigger, deeper sound built on undeniable chemistry, lush three-part harmonies, and instrumental virtuosity with a funky edge.  

Their new album Stranger to Me was an immediate critical and fan success, debuting at #5 on the Billboard Folk/Americana chart, #9 on the Billboard Current Country chart, and #61 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums chart – no small feat for a band that eschews record labels in order to remain independent and in control of their sound. And what a sound it is: built on the foundation of the familiar roots rock of some of the greatest bands of the past, but altogether fresh, modern, sharp; swirling with psychedelic overtones, torch ballad longing, and an indie rock edge.

www.theblacklillies.com

 


DAVID TAYLOR AND THE TALLBOYS

Start Time: 8:00

David Taylor has nothing to do with the fact that he has a band; he just got lucky one night. Having been a solo singer/song-writer for several years in the Charlotte music scene, David has built up quite the catalog of songs. He has performed throughout the Charlotte area, and he self-released a solo EP titled Texas Heat in July 2018.

David Taylor & The Tallboys were born after several beers and an impromptu jam session on a Monday night with the help of friends Gersh Godwin on bass, and Jason Cline on lead guitar. Wes Hamilton joined the party on pedal steel guitar, and Matt Sloop filled out the lineup on drums. The Tallboys take David’s songs and turn them into twangy rock-n-roll tunes that make you want to dance, stomp your feet, and cry at the same time. 

Despite only having been a band since early 2019, David Taylor & The Tallboys have already started making waves in the music scene. They have played at local festivals, house parties, and venues such as The Evening Muse, Snug Harbor, and The Pour House. 

www.davidtaylormusic.net

 

Swansgate, Beloved Binge, and Bob Fleming & the Cambria Iron Co
Oct 20 @ 8:30 pm

Swansgate: Art rock channeling pop on a ouija board you dusted off from psychedelia’s closet

Beloved Binge: Jangle pop hooks for misfits (Philly)

Bob Fleming and the Cambria Iron Company: Americana punk riding a fixed gear across the countryside (Greensboro)

All this for 7$

Oct
25
Fri
ROBERT RANDOLPH & THE FAMILY BAND with Hollis Brown
Oct 25 @ 8:00 pm

ROBERT RANDOLPH & THE FAMILY BAND

Robert Randolph took a step outside when it was time to record his new album, Brighter Days, choosing to work with producer Dave Cobb. Cobb is best known for his work with new country stars like Chris Stapleton, Sturgill Simpson, Brandi Carlile, and Jason Isbell. Looking beyond anyone’s expectations or his own preconceptions helped Randolph circle back to where it all began for him: church music.

The first three songs of Brighter Days are a full dive back to Randolph’s gospel roots, starting with lead track “Baptize Me”, a joyous romp of a song that makes a direct connection between religious and musical ecstasy and salvation.

“Dave Cobb is just a guy who likes to record good music and good songs,” says Randolph. “He wanted to do something that was fun but it also gives you a gospel feeling. He knows the history of our band, coming from church and giving that fun church feeling to people.

“We wrote ‘Baptize Me’ the first day in the studio. It’s really a love story, about an all-round love: for each other, for our audience, for our church background, for the music we love and for our fans. All of these songs kind of harken back to how we started, to being known as this musical family band that comes from the church and appeals to rock, blues, gospel and soul music audiences. We wanted that good gospel, blues, R&B feel, because that’s where we started and it’s good to not only remind people of that but to actively remember it ourselves.”

Randolph grew up playing sacred steel music – basically gospel played on pedal steel guitar – in the House of God church in Orange, New Jersey, and began taking his joyous, gospel-infused music out to clubs, backed by family members who shared not only backgrounds, but blood.

“The Family Band” Is not just a name meant to evoke connections of togetherness. They are an actual family; the group that supports Randolph is anchored by his cousins, bassist Danyel Morgan and drummer Marcus Randolph and his sister, vocalist Lenesha Randolph.

“That whole thing sort of gets lost,” says Randolph. “People are always wondering, ‘are these guys really a family?’ Yes we are! And it’s another thing we wanted to remind everyone of with this album.” Given his goals for the album, it’s fitting that the lone cover song Robert selected for the collection comes from Pops Staples and the Staple Singers, one of gospel’s greatest musical families, who seamlessly crossed over to secular R&B success with inspirational songs like “Respect Yourself” and “I’ll Take You There.” Their “Simple Man” is a deep, contemplative blues, its pensive nature amplified by Randolph’s signature weeping pedal steel guitar lines.

Producer Cobb is renowned for his vocal work and has often said that the voice comes first for him so it’s no surprise that he helped coax out some of Randolph’s best, deepest, most nuanced singing on the nine songs where he takes the lead. It is a little surprising, however, just how simple Cobb’s “secret” really was: just be yourself.

“Often when you do vocals a producer can really focus on tuning, and have an attitude of cutting things down and creating a vocal performance word by word or line for line,” Randolph recalls. “Dave just said, ‘Let’s get into the character of the song and sing it on down.’ It’s all about a character, breathing and relaxing. He told me to relax, feel the song, get into and be who I was. He had some good tips, like when to get close to the mic and when to back off, but really he was just focused on being myself and conveying the song as I heard it. And that was the attitude of this whole album: Let’s be ourselves and show the world who we are.”

“When you think about Stax music and a lot of music from the 70s, especially like the Staple Singers, it was inspirational and you danced you had a good time. That’s what we really wanted to hone in on here: let’s sound good and have a natural good time that will bring listeners along. All of the music that we played in the beginning was what we would play in church. We just turned it into long jams.

“Over the years I’ve learned how to write these songs that make you feel kind of spiritual and have the gospel roots, just like the great music of people like the Four Tops, Temptations and Ray Charles. It all comes from the same place. We don’t want to sound like them – or like anybody – but that’s the feeling we want to evoke.”

HOLLIS BROWN

Hollis Brown is an American Rock ‘n’ Roll band. Named after a Bob Dylan song (“The Ballad of Hollis Brown”), the band was formed by Queens-natives and songwriters Mike Montali (lead vocals/guitar) and Jonathan Bonilla (lead guitar). Both 2nd-generation immigrants (Italian-American and Puerto Rican-American, respectively), they soon found their musical brethren across America, recruiting Andrew Zehnal (drums) from Cleveland and Adam Bock (keyboard/vocals) from St. Louis.

Hollis Brown’s latest vinyl EP, Cluster of Pearls (Alive Naturalsound Records), was chosen as one of the 300 select releases throughout the world for Record Store Day 2016. Pressed on Starburst Vinyl, the record is limited to 800 copies and features four previously unreleased tracks and two songs released on vinyl for the first time. Cluster of Pearls follows up the 2015 release of Hollis Brown’s third album 3 Shots (Jullian Records/RED), featuring the Bo Diddley collaboration “Rain Dance,” and the duet “Highway 1” with acclaimed alt-country songstress Nikki Lane. The edgy, roots-rock indie band from Queens, NY, known for its adrenaline fueled performances, recently wrapped 40+ amphitheater shows across America supporting Counting Crows and Citizen Cope last Summer/Fall, followed by a month-long headline tour in the UK and Europe.

The independent act has achieved a significant amount of success since their formation in 2009. They released their debut album Ride On The Train on Alive Naturalsound in 2013 (produced by Adam Landry), garnering song and video premieres from Rolling Stone, Paste, and American Songwriter, along with music placements on Direct TV’s ‘Kingdom,’ Showtime’s “Shameless,” MTV’s “Real World,” and the Willem Dafoe/Matt Dillon film “Bad Country”. Following a Lou Reed tribute concert in NYC, Alive Naturalsound asked the band to record a tribute to the Velvet Underground’s classic album Loaded, as a limited-edition vinyl release for Record Store Day 2014. Hollis Brown Gets Loaded took on a life of its own, with airplay on influential radio stations, resulting in a full CD & digital release.

The band has toured extensively in America and Europe, headlining and supporting such bands as The Zombies, Jackie Greene, Heartless Bastards, Rich Robinson of Black Crowes, and Jesse Malin, and building an impressive fan base on both continents.

DeadlockNCHC at Tommy’s Pub
Oct 25 @ 8:30 pm – 11:30 pm

DeadlockNCHC, Witchpit, and Queen City Rejects

Deadlock NCHC

Musician/Band
Hardcore band from the hills of North Carolina that have been playing together since 1994.
 

Witchpit

Musician/Band
Sludge metal/hard rock act from South Carolina

Denny Stone – Vocals
Thomas White – Guitar
Zach Hanley – Bass
Josh Bishop – Drums

Instagram @witchpitband

for booking please contact
Andrea Roberts
ati.andrear@gmail.com

Oct
26
Sat
Matt Walsh Band
Oct 26 @ 9:00 pm
Matt Walsh is a vocalist, guitarist and prolific songwriter from Statesville NC who performs 200 plus shows a year either solo or with his rhythm section, ‘The Movers’. His album ‘Life After Rock N Roll’ (2017 Full Bloom Records) has been hailed by music publications and played on radio stations in the US, Canada, Germany, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands and Australia and his new release, ‘The Midnight Strain’ (2018 Full Bloom Records) is quickly catching up to that status since it’s release on November 10th. Matt’s sound is a clever blend of numerous styles of the music that have influenced him since his youth – early electric and country Blues, Rock N Roll, Rockabilly, Soul, R&B, Country, Bluegrass, Jazz and Psychedelia. His focus on making all original music by combining the influences that inspired him, along with his own ideas, have produced an exciting blend of many genres without rules or limitations.
His exposure to music came first came from his mother through her love of Motown. When Matt was 9 years old, she took him to a Prince concert and afterwards, he knew he wanted to be a musician. His musical education began with his late uncle who turned him onto a record collection that included early 1950’s electric Blues and 1960’s Rock which inspired Matt to play guitar. When he was 13, Matt got a knock off electric guitar for $25 at a flea market and set out to learn the instrument. He furthered his musical education when he began absorbing the music on old record labels, notably Chess, Sun and Stax .
Less than a decade later, he began performing in clubs and in the years to follow, he established himself as a highly regarded musician in the Blues world with his first release, ‘Hard Luck’ (2007), as one of the few artists in the genre capable of writing relevant original material without relying on any cover songs from the past. The album got rave reviews in multiple music publications, radio play on stations around the world and a featured spot on XM 74 Satellite Radio as a ‘Pick to Click’. Around this time Matt joined Bob Margolin (guitarist for Muddy Waters 1973-1980) and performed with some of his heroes, legendary artists like Howlin’ Wolf’s guitarist Hubert Sumlin, Pinetop Perkins and Willie ‘Big Eyes’ Smith.
While he was looking for a new direction to expand his music, Matt started working with drummer Austin Hicks after they met on Craigslist in 2013. They formed the drum-guitar duo, the Low Counts and branded themselves as, ‘Blue Collar Rock-N-Roll’. They turned heads, made dedicated fans and blew audiences away with their no frills, high energy stage show. Their ride was cut short on March 8th 2017 when Austin passed away unexpectedly. Matt wrote 27 songs that the duo released over three albums in the four short years they were together (The Low Counts 2014, Unsettled Days 2015, Years Pass BY 2015)
Matt released his first solo album in almost a decade, ‘Life After Rock N Roll’ on Full Bloom Records November 17th 2017. The album reignited his standing as a solo artist and found him stretching out to make powerful, refined music that was entirely different than any of his previous works. Matt just released his third full length studio album, ‘The Midnight Strain’, on Full Bloom Records on November 10th 2018 and it has received rave reviews and a wealth of radio play. He is currently working on another album that he recorded recently at Columbia Records Studio A on Music Row in Nashville TN which he plans to release in 2019.
Nov
7
Thu
The SiriusXM Coffeehouse Tour featuring Joshua Radin & The Weepies
Nov 7 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Share in an evening of indie-Americana with singer-songwriters Joshua Radin and Deb Talan and Steve Tannen of The Weepies. These musicians explore the intricacies and adventures of love with distinctive sentiment and exceptional lyricism.

About Joshua Radin

Love and the complications surrounding it have long been Joshua Radin’s songwriting forte. Featured in more than 150 different films, commercials and TV shows, Radin’s songs have reached large audiences with their ability to convey all of the ambivalence and excited uncertainness of new love.

About The Weepies

Deb Talan and Steve Tannen began writing songs together the night they met. Soon after, they formed The Weepies, an indie junket launched by the now husband-wife duo’s harmonies and insightful songwriting. Their charming performance style and prolific work ethic have led to the sale of more than 1.5 million records and fans across the globe.

Nov
8
Fri
David Childers & The Serpents with Carolina Gator Gumbo
Nov 8 @ 8:00 pm

David Childers & The Serpents
Singer-songwriter David Childers is the proverbial study in contradictions. A resident of Mount Holly, North Carolina, he’s a former high-school football player with the aw-shucks demeanor of a good ol’ Southern boy. But he’s also a well-read poet and painter who cites Chaucer and Kerouac as influences, fell in love with folk as a teen, and listens to jazz and opera.
http://www.davidchilders.com

Carolina Gator Gumbo
Carolina GATOR GUMBO, based in Charlotte NC, is a well seasoned Cajun & Creole band bringing festive music from southwest Louisiana to the Carolinas since the early 90’s! This friendly mix of high spirited musicians have sought and studied Cajun/Creole music, dance & culture throughout the southeast. ‘Leona Had A Party’, the band’s most recent recording has been met with great reviews:
http://www.reverbnation.com/carolinagatorgumbo

*Petra’s is a private club and a valid ID is required for entry. You will also be expected to pay a $1 annual fee if you are not already a member. Thanks!

Nov
15
Fri
The Menders | The Gone Ghosts | Trent Thompson
Nov 15 @ 9:00 pm

The Menders
Combining Garage Rock influences into a high energy Americana-Folk sound in the vein of the Beatles, Jack White, and The Doors.
http://www.themendersnc.com

The Gone Ghosts
The Gone Ghosts is an Americana/Rock band from Carrboro NC, formed by singer/guitarist and songwriter Dave Hedeman and bassist Dillon Partin from The Vagabond Union. Joined by singer/guitarist Justin Bowlin and drummer Scott Jones.
http://www.thegoneghosts.com

Trent Thompson
Based in Charlotte NC, singer/songwriter Trent Thompson brings passion and authenticity in his guitar-based rock. Trent began writing and singing his original music in 2012 with a local Charlotte band “Reaves”. Now as a solo artist, Trent pulls from his religious roots and his real life experiences when it comes to writing and holds nothing back.
https://www.goodbrothersnc.com/trent-thompson

*Petra’s is a private club and a valid ID is required to enter. You will also be expected to pay a $1 annual fee if you are not already a member with us.

Nov
17
Sun
Sarah Peacock
Nov 17 @ 7:30 pm

1.2 million miles, 2,800 shows, and fourteen years of flying solo is quite a road trip. Sarah Peacock bridges gaps between Country, Blues, Americana, and Rock-N-Roll. Her music is raw, truth telling, and fiercely unique.

Held hostage by her record label at 21, the troubadour life came with a rude awakening for the young Georgia native. Peacock made her home in a ‘92 Volvo with her dog and a guitar, and for nearly seven years earned a living in the corner shadows of American dive bars.

The tables turned in 2011 when an anonymous fan helped Peacock buy out of her recording contract. Since then, she has released six additional albums and won multiple awards for her songwriting. “Hurricane” won Best Song in the American Songwriting Awards, and “Beautiful” was a winner with International Unsigned Only. “The Cool Kids,” and “Are We There Yet” have nominated her for Best Female Artist and Best Song in a number of songwriting competitions. Peacock was also named Listening Room Network’s Artist of the Year.

In 2013, Peacock released her self-produced album, Albuquerque Sky, recorded in hotel rooms across the country while maintaining her rigorous 250 show tour schedule. Albuquerque Sky was followed by a season of goodbyes, tremendous growth, and challenges, and became the catalyst for her next album, Dream On (2016). “This record helped me get un-stuck. I had a collection of live recordings which became Dream On. After such a creative dry spell, I knew I needed to hit the road and stay out a while – reconnect with my fans,” says a determined Peacock. “I found this old silver eagle tour bus in Austin, TX. I was so enchanted with it, and the renovation process really reigniting my troubadour flame. So I bought my very first bus. Oh, what a feeling!” But less than 4 months later, she would watch it burn to the ground at a California truck stop.

One of Peacock’s fans voluntarily initiated a fundraiser, which is what kept her on the road. Another fan, so touched by her story, donated his motor home so that her tour could go on. That special connection between Sarah Peacock and her fans is what gives her the strength to continue overcoming. “You have to be unstoppable, even when you don’t believe you are.” That’s the modus operandi for the now half Tennessean, half Texan road warrior.

Sarah Peacock is active in the anti-bullying community, and her song, “The Cool Kids” has become a powerful anti-bullying anthem. Its message has taken on a life of its own. As she travels the country, Peacock shares her story in schools, empowering young people to embody her message of kindness and love.

Peacock is also an animal lover and tours with her pups as often as she can. Her late road dog, Gibson, was one of the first canines to receive a prosthetic mitral valve in a clinical trial at CSU in Ft. Collins, CO in May of 2017. Unfortunately, Gibson passed away. To honor his memory, Peacock recently formed her own 501(c)3, The Band Waggin,’ benefiting various animal health and rescue programs throughout the United States.

After completing two EP’s for Nashville label, American Roots Records, Peacock plans to release a full length album on her own label in 2019. Sarah Peacock is the truest definition of a self-made overcomer, hustler, and DIY machine. She’s got a remarkable knack for finding beauty in the ashes, and there’s no denying the future is looking bright for this tenacious up and comer.

 

Nov
19
Tue
The Dip with Erin & the Wildfire
Nov 19 @ 8:00 pm

THE DIP

Hailing from Seattle, The Dip is an electrifying seven-piece ensemble that melds vintage rhythm and blues and modern pop with 60s soul, tapped by KEXP as “one of the most exciting and joyous acts to emerge in recent years”. The group quickly gained notoriety throughout the Pacific Northwest for their eminently danceable live shows that feature vocals from frontman Tom Eddy (Beat Connection), an effortlessly deep pocket, and the melodies of the “The Honeynut Horns”. Hard-hitting but sensitive, The Dip harkens back to the deep soul roots of decades past while sounding undeniably relevant. The band’s 2015 self-titled debut, recorded to tape at Avast! Studios, propelled them to notable appearances at Sasquatch! Music Festival, High Sierra Music Fest, Summer Meltdown, and Capitol Hill Block Party and built anticipation for their 2016 release, Won’t Be Coming Back (EP). Now, the band prepares to arrive on the national stage with their second LP, The Dip Delivers. There’s a certain alchemy to The Dip that unites music fans of all ages and backgrounds and leaves everyone smiling ear to ear.

ERIN & THE WILDFIRE

Powerful vocals. Infectious hooks. Sensual harmonies. Snacks.

Erin & the Wildfire combine elements of funk, soul, and R&B into a unique experience for fans. Featuring the core four: Matt Wood (bass), Ryan Lipps (guitar), Nick Quillen (drums) and Erin Lunsford (vocals) – who’ve been together since college, evolving their sound for six years – and a rotating menagerie of talented musicians out of Virginia.

The lyrical content comes from Lunsford’s life, loves, and the passions of her and the rest of the Wildfire – including those of female solidarity, body positivity, and pizza. The demanding presence of Lunsford’s voice, combined with the talent and charm of Quillen, Lipps, and Wood, makes for a high energy, inspiring performance that stays with you until the next time.

“Each show feels like it’s the next and last chance to explain ourselves –another chance to connect with the audience to speak our truth. We hope that people seeing us for the first time (and repeat viewers!) feel appreciated and comfortable and we hope they feel inspired by the tunes.” Lunsford, “The Young Folks”

Dec
10
Tue
Robert Earl Keen’s Countdown to Christmas
Dec 10 @ 7:30 pm – 10:30 pm

Robert Earl Keen announces the launch of his eighth annual Christmas show with his most extensive tour yet!

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Keen’s theme for this year’s tour is COUNTDOWN TO CHRISTMAS: Lunar Tunes & Looney Times. He and his band will pay homage to the space race and all things celestial in an out-of-this-world evening of family holiday fun. “This show will turn on the psychedelactic jukebox and light up the tree of tranquility!” Keen adds. “The countdown begins now!”  In T-minus 122 days and counting, concertgoers will blast off with Keen’s classic “Merry Christmas from the Family,” fan favorites, and unearthly covers from his band members.

Opening act: Shinyribs

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